January 2011


Buzz Cut


Presenter/Tyer:
Steve Jacobsen

Adams

Pattern:
Hook: Size appropriate to fly being imitated
Thread: 8/0 of an appropriate color
Tail: 4 - 6 microfibbets tied in
a V or splayed fashion
Body: Chicken quill of a suitable color wound to about 3/4 the length of the shaft
Hackle: Stiff hackle two sizes larger than normal

Comments and Tying Instructions:
This fly is inspired by the Swisher Richards flies of the 1980's. They wanted realistic dry fly imatations which brought the abdomens down onto the water surface, and longer, more delicate tails.

Specific comments on pattern and tying:

Hook: Since this is a generic dry fly pattern, it can be tied in any size and any color. I do recommend barbless or pinched barb hooks since they allow for releases without removing the fish from the water or ever touching it.

Tail: 4-6 fibbets tied in a V or splayed fashion. This can be accomplished by winding a "thread mound" of 12-15 turns just before the hook bend and tying fibbets on either side of the "mound". A faster but slightly more difficult approach is to splay the fibbets using a a figure 8 pattern with your thread. The tails should be 1 1/2 times the shaft length. (Swisher and Richards believed most commercial dry flies had tails that are too thick and too short.)

Body: Chicken quill of a suitable color is wound to about 3/4 the length of the shaft. Be sure to soak the quills in warm water for at least 5 minutes to avoid delaminating and breaking.

Hackle: Stiff hackle two sizes larger than normal forms an impressive "wing profile" without having to tie an actual wing. Whip finish. The hackle color is chosen for the species desired.

Finish the fly by inverting it in the vice and clipping the hackle straight across the bottom of the fly at the level of the point. This will allow the fly to sit in the film while remaining dry and highly visible.

This is a generic dry fly approach which can be used to simulate any mayfly with the appropriate hook size and color combinations. The fly is very light, does not have the twisting problems of some conventional "winged" dries, and is highly visible and very durable.


Photograph ©2011 by Marv Slind